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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 170-172

Effectiveness of teaching programme on knowledge of mothers regarding the effect of family conflicts on school children


Department of Child Health Nursing, Yenepoya Nursing College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication11-Nov-2014

Correspondence Address:
G S Shilpa
Department of Child Health Nursing, Yenepoya Nursing College, Deralakatte - 575 018, Mangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2321-4848.144328

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  Abstract 

Background: Conflict within home has been found to have a negative effect on many aspects of children's functioning. The incident rate of abnormal behavior and poor scholastic performance is high among the children with conflict in their family. Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of planned teaching program in terms of gain in knowledge of mothers regarding effects of family conflicts on children. Materials and Methods: This study involved pre-experimental one group pretest and post-test design. A sample of 50 mothers was selected by non-probability purposive sampling technique in the Talapady area. Structured knowledge questionnaire was used to assess the pretest and post-test knowledge. Results: Regarding effectiveness of teaching program, the overall mean percentage of knowledge score was 46.25% in the pre-test and 80% in the post-test. The enhancement in the mean percentage knowledge score was found to be significant. Discussion: Research conducted in this area suggested that conflict between parents is a consistent predictor for increasing anxiety in children, which needs to be prevented by educating the parents.

Keywords: Teaching programme, family conflicts, knowledge of mothers


How to cite this article:
Shilpa G S, Mathias J, Babu L, Abraham L, Mathew LS, George LA, Jenifer L, Lubaiba N P, Madhura, Mathew M, Varghese M, Xaviour M. Effectiveness of teaching programme on knowledge of mothers regarding the effect of family conflicts on school children . Arch Med Health Sci 2014;2:170-2

How to cite this URL:
Shilpa G S, Mathias J, Babu L, Abraham L, Mathew LS, George LA, Jenifer L, Lubaiba N P, Madhura, Mathew M, Varghese M, Xaviour M. Effectiveness of teaching programme on knowledge of mothers regarding the effect of family conflicts on school children . Arch Med Health Sci [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Oct 17];2:170-2. Available from: http://www.amhsjournal.org/text.asp?2014/2/2/170/144328


  Introduction Top


In today's world, parents know to keep their children safe from psychological harm. They may wish to control media used by children such as books, music, and television shows with an assumption of negative influence of these media on their children's development. [1] However, surprisingly, many parents do not realize that they and their relationships also influences their children's development.

A child needs emotional safety and security in order to thrive academically and socially. The environment at home between the parents creates that sense of security. It is the child's world. Parenting behavior further accounts for differences in child well-being by family structure. Children typically fare best when parents maintain a strong parent-child bond, apply consistent discipline, and respond firmly but warmly to situations at home. [2]

When there is conflict, argument, and tension between parents, it basically shatters the secure safety net of their children and has an extremely negative impact on the current and future mental health of the children. [3]

Family conflict can affect children of all ages. Children exhibit higher physiological symptoms of distress such as elevated heart rate; signs of distress, such as crying, acting out, freezing, and signs of emotional and behavioral distress at 6 months, 5 years, and 6-17 years, respectively. [4]

Additional research indicates that exposure to this form of discord can manifest itself in several ways including increased anxiety, depression, aggression, hostility, anti-social behavior, and criminality as well as deficits in academic attainment. [5]

An enormous amount of research has been conducted to investigate the specific areas of children's lives that are profoundly affected by such ongoing parental conflict. The effects that ongoing parental conflict has on modeling behavior for children, children's feelings of safety, the parent-child relationship, mental health and attachment, the child's behavior, social relationships, academic performance, and cognition. [6]

Research on children's adjustment suggests that family conflict results in adjustment problems. Conflicts at home has been found to have a negative effect on many aspects of children's functioning, such as expressions of aggression, sociability and control problems, suicidal ideation, psychological distress, and adjustment. [7]

Based on statistical reviews and experience, the researcher has found that family conflicts are ongoing problems in the community, which has greater impact on a child's development. Hence, the researcher felt the need to create awareness among the parents as a prevention strategy to this problem.


  Materials and Methods Top


An evaluative approach was selected for this study. The research design implemented was pre-experimental one group pretest and post-test design.

The data was collected using non-probability purposive sampling technique. Fifty mothers of school children between the age group of 6-12 years were selected for the study. The study was conducted in Talapady community area, Mangalore. The tools used for this study were demographic proforma and structured questionnaire. After the ethical approval from the Ethical Committee of Yenepoya University, the tool was pre-tested by administering it to five mothers. The reliability of the tool was tested (r = 0.8). Pilot study was conducted to find out the feasibility of the study. Data analysis was done by using both descriptive and inferential statistics.


  Results Top


The study sample consisted of 50 mothers of school children. Majority of the mothers 26 (52%) were in the age group of (30-39) years and 60% of them had completed lower primary education. Majority of the mothers (48%) were beedi rollers. Most mothers (90%) were from a nuclear family. Nearly 84% of the samples belonged to Muslim religion.

Analysis of pretest and post-test knowledge score of mothers regarding effects of family

Most of the subjects (76.67%) had average level of knowledge and 23.33% subjects had good level of knowledge in the pretest, whereas 33% had excellent knowledge, 65% had good knowledge, and 2% had average knowledge in the post-test [Figure 1].
Figure 1: Level of pretest and post test knowledge of mothers regarding effects of family conflict on children

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Significant difference between pretest and post-test on knowledge score

The findings revealed that the mean post-test score was significantly higher than mean pretest score. The 't' value (7.345) was greater than the table value. Hence, there was a significant gain in the knowledge of mothers [Table 1].
Table 1: Significance difference between Pretest and post test on knowledge score

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Association between knowledge of mothers and selected demographic variables

There is significant association between the knowledge score and demographic variable type of family (χ2(1) = 4.78, table value χ2(1) = 3.84; P < 0.05), and no significant association with other demographic variables. Thus, it is interpreted that family conflicts are influenced by type of family (nuclear and joint) [Table 2].
Table 2: Association between knowledge of the mothers with selected demographic variables

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  Discussion Top


Family conflict, which is frequent, intense, and poorly resolved, can be profoundly harmful for children. It also exerts negative effects on the child's development. The present study was conducted in one of the urban community area of Mangalore to assess the knowledge level of mothers regarding effects of family conflicts on children.

In the present study, result revealed that most of the subjects (76.67%) have average level of knowledge followed by good level of knowledge for 23.33% subjects. The findings revealed that the mean post-test score was significantly higher than mean pretest score. Hence, there was a significant gain in the knowledge of mothers. The above findings of the study are compatible with the findings of Robertson and Pryor [8] , who reported that after the care measures, there was reduced parental conflict, more satisfactory care arrangements, and improved child adjustment. The PTS program had fared well in achieving most of its goals.

The present study findings shows that there was significant association between the knowledge score and demographic variable type of family and no association between other variables such as age, education, religion, occupation, type of family, and religion. [9] Findings of the present study are consistent with another study conducted in Virginia showed that parental relationship significantly influenced by six demographic variables: age and gender of the child, mother's age at birth of the child, household income, race, and child's closeness to father/mother.


  Conclusion Top


The present study found that mothers had average knowledge regarding the effect of family conflicts on children. The knowledge level of the mothers was empowered with essential information. Intervention programs that focus on the parent-child relationship have the potential to rectify the negative consequences of family stress, family conflict, and family breakdown on children and parents, and also helps to prevent the intergenerational transmission of factors that lead to disrupted family relationships and child's physical and psychological development.

Hence, the researcher strongly recommends organization of educational programs that dispense the information helpful for child's overall development and helps in creating healthy children.

 
  References Top

1.Available from: http://www.education.com/magazine/article/conflict-impact-on-kids. [Last accessed on 2011 Dec 2].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Elizabeth M. Ellis. Divorce Wars: Intervention with. Families in Conflict. Baltimore: Port City Press, 2000, p. 49.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.King V. Nonresidential father involvement and child well-being: Can dads make a difference? J Fam Issues 1994;15:78-96.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Harold G, Pryor J, Reynolds J. Not in front of the children? How conflict between parents affects children. One-Plus-One Marriage and Partnership Research: London; 2001.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Harold GT, Aitken JJ, Shelton KH. Inter-parental conflict and children's academic attainment: A longitudinal analysis. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2007;48:1223-32.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Ainsworth MD. Attachments beyond infancy. Am Psychol 1989;44:709-16.  Back to cited text no. 6
[PUBMED]    
7.Vandewater EA, Lansford JE. Influences of family structure and parental conflict on children's well-being. Fam Relat 1998;47:323-33.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.Robertson J, Pryor J. Evaluation of an information program for separating parents. J Fam Stud 2011;17:24-35.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.Falci CD. The Effects of Family Structure and Family Process on the Psychological Well-Being of Children: From the Children's Point of View. May 1997: Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for the degree of Masters of Science in Sociology. Available from: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available.  Back to cited text no. 9
    


    Figures

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    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

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Abstract
Introduction
Materials and Me...
Results
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